Tu Bish What?

And it’s yet another Jewish New Year, this time in celebration of nature. Nice, huh. Today Tu B’Shvat is referred to as the New Year of the Trees, but its celebratory roots are in 16th century mysticism and the arrival of springtime. That’s got to seem pretty crazy in late January, especially if you’re anywhere on the East Coast right now and buried in the weekend’s massive snowfall. Over here in the Barcelona hills, the ground may still say winter but the almond and mimosa trees have already been in full bloom for two weeks. Granted they’re way ahead of schedule this year, but it is normal for daffodils to push through the earth in February, and to see and feel springtime well on its way to returning.

Almond blossoms

Almond blossoms in January

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Happy New Year!

raw foodMay 2016 provide you with every kind of nourishment, and as much IMG_4833 (2)of it as you need.

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Recipe for a sweet & abundant New Year

The article I’d planned on posting next is so grisly,  I just can’t post it now.  Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, begins tomorrow, and with it a very beautiful season of renewal. So I’ve set the article aside, but not without sharing that with each grisly discovery or insight I have into history, the more deeply I appreciate being able to celebrate my holidays, eat my foods and just be my authentic self. This is something I truly wish for all people. Αll. The world would be a sweeter place.

On Rosh Hashana we wish for a sweet new year. The theme is traditionally emphasized by eating honey, whereas beans, often in the form of black eyed peas, are consumed to encourage abundance and prosperity. Eating beans for prosperity is a Sephardic New Year tradition, though we’re not alone; on December 31st Italians eat lentils for the same reason, and modern Spaniards eat twelve grapes at the stroke of midnight. Continue reading

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Where’s the Beef? (All About Mina, Part One, and Some Medieval Haggadahs)

Last weekend I went to see the Medieval Haggadah exhibition that’s just opened at the Barcelona History Museum. For the first time since the Expulsion, eight illuminated Haggadot, made in Catalunya in the 14th & 15th centuries, are in their country of origin after having been smuggled out hundreds of years ago to save them from destruction.

Barcelona Haggadah 28v29r.l

I’d hoped one or two of them might be opened to illustrations of a Medieval Catalan Seder table, and that among the foods represented I might spot a mina. It wasn’t an unrealistic expectation. Mina is a Passover meat pie that’s unique to Spanish Jews, essential to our holiday meal and as significant for us as any ritual element of the Seder. The why has been a huge mystery for generations already. I grew up without ever hearing any explanation for its importance, and no wonder: it took me years to unravel the mystery satisfactorily myself, and I had to move to Spain to do so. Today I begin to explain it all for you. If pies could talk… Continue reading

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